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So Much Great Literature Goes Unread

May 20th, 2011 by Michael Tabor

Now more than ever, because people DON’T read as much as they used to, there is a prodigious trove of great literature that goes unread.
Last year I received as a gift – a hefty book – one of those “1001 things you must do before you die”series that are so popular today but this was entitled ‘1001 Books you must Read Before you Die”. To my great surprise this was a collection of truly magnificent literature from Aesop’s Fables to Moby Dick to Don Delillo’s Underworld, Ian McEwan, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paul Auster and so much more. I was expecting to see Harry Potter , Danielle Steele, Tom Clancy, Deen Koontz, John Grisham, James Patterson, Mary Higgins Clark, Anne Rice, Harold Robbins, and Stephan King (poor Mr. King,  I heard that he doesn’t like the fact that the literary critics don’t see him as a gentleman of letters. Too bad, he just must accept his limitations and count his money; one cannot even find SK in the fiction section, let alone literature. He’s in the horror section right next to adult animation – comic books) No this was the real thing. When you looked at the 3 dozen or so contributors, you could see that they were all literary critics with Ph.Ds.
Every one of my favorites was in here but there were so many geniuses I’ve never read like E.L. Doctorow, T. Coraghessan Boyle and 100s more. I suddenly thought of myself of one who rather instead of being well-read but well quite frankly – ignorant. Everyone knows that great literature is so much more important than non-fiction. Literature like great classical music lasts forever and their words will forever be etched into our collective consciousness to be handed down from  generations to come until the end of time. In terms of what art form leaves the longest, strongest, most influential, most resonant, and most powerful legacy – the power of great literature is the best. Artists and composers may differ with me but I say the written word if it is true, will remain true forever and the eternal truths it teaches us can and must only be conveyed via fiction.
So that you get the right book, it’s – 1001 books You Must Read Before You Die, edited by Peter Boxall and the text is written by scores of literary critics. I read a lot and I used to read more (yes I read when I’m driving – at lights or when there’s traffic.) Now if I’m awake – I’m reading, writing or watching film. I also have been watching a lot of C-SPAN – 1,2 and 3. I used to only watch C-SPAN 2 for Book TV but all 3 channels are great. They have intellectual talk shows with no commercials everyday – not just congress in action (even I get bored with that).
The point is there is so much great literature and great information (and sadly a whole lot of s**t but you can just ignore that stuff) out there that one can’t get to it all, especially if you have kids. I’m a book worm and I feel that I need another 50 years to get through this amazing list. Plus I do read non-fiction, the paper, and The New Yorker every day.
It saddens me that a majority of these amazing books are going to go unread; but it does make me feel good that the great will be around for future generations. Greatness lasts forever. Sure Deen Koontz and the like are best sellers now but they will be gone in 100 YEARS AND David Foster Wallace will still be with us RIP.
I’ve said this a million times and I will say it again- ‘Life is short and art is long’ I am poor in terms of money but I’m the richest man on the planet when I allow Marcel Proust into my life.
You know the deal – hover, click and shop away. Perhaps you can purchase this book if wish.  I am personally hooked on this book. For the past week, I haven’t gone anywhere without it. Even if you don’t read the actual books listed in here, the reviews are wonderful. So much greatness, so little time.

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The Styrons

April 23rd, 2011 by Michael Tabor

Alexandra Styron has just written a book about her famous author and father – William Styron. This is not a book review but I have read the NY Times critique (it is a memoir) and I must say this sounds like a good read. I am blogging about William Styron because firstly I am a fan (I have read three of his works) and furthermore there is so much to write about this celebrated, sophisticated, and high-toned bohemian household.
I was amazed to read that the Styrons were friends with so many famous, eclectic, and interesting people. The Styrons hosted many renowned dinner parties either at the mansion in Connecticut or Martha’s Vineyard. Some of their guests included Bill Clinton, Gabriel Garcia Marquez (famous Columbian novelist), Sondra Radyanovsky – talented and extraordinary American soprano, Edward Kennedy, James Jones, James Baldwin, Carly Simon, Arthur Miller, Leonard Bernstein and so many more. They also enjoyed great conversation at these parties as one can imagine.
It is hard to fathom that a person in William Styron who had it all – fame, fortune, a plethora of celebrity friends, Luxurious homes in the finest regions of this country, etc., could ever fall victim to severe clinical depression.  He wrote about his affliction in 1990 in the apt and very creative title ‘Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness.’ I have personally suffered from depression and have read my share of books on the topic and I can honestly say that this short book resonated with me so vividly that in my opinion if one is interested in learning about despair at its worse, one need only to read this one book. Bear in mind, it is grim so do not read it if you or a loved one is not in the grips of depression (life is too short. Who wants to be weighed down by a book about such personal agony).
The New York Times Review stated that William Styon’s  genetic talent was successfully passed on to his youngest daughter. The memoir is well-written, produced with a flair and a style of her own (Alexandra Styron had written a novel before this), and is a compelling recollection of what it was like being a child and growing up and being raised by this loving but sometimes cruel and prodigiously flawed famous father. William Styron had a furious temper and was irritable beyond words even before he fell victim to suicidal depression(note: William Styron unsuccessfully attempted suicide and died of natural causes at the age of 81 in 2006.) As a matter of fact, much ink is spilled during the period when Mr. Styron was most famous – in 1979 after he had written his most famous novel – Sophie’s Choice’. This novel was later made into a successful movie starring huge actors at the time – Meryl Streep and Kevin Kline. This made the Styrons very wealthy and brought accreditation to William’s literary talents.
I probably am going to read this memoir but I sometimes wonder why individuals share with the world such personal and quite frankly very unflattering and embarrassing details about a loved one. Well to answer my own question and if I were conjecturing cynically I would say for the money. A few days back I wrote about celebrity biographies and without a doubt that is just self-promotion. However, William Styron was a good writer and obviously, there is a something to say about this larger-than-life upbringing. Furthermore it’s not all bad. Alexendra loved her father and she does invite the readers to perhaps get a glimpse of what it was like.
Now it’s your turn WHADAWETHINK ? Are you a fan of William Styron? Did you read or see the movie ‘Sophie’s Choice’?  Why do you think people share with the world such personal matters? As you know, I am personally opposed to silly self-promoting biographies by non-writers but we are talking about something entirely different here.

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List of My Favorite Ten Great Works of Literature – Part 3

February 25th, 2011 by Michael Tabor

Thus far I have listed:

  1. ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ – J.D. Salinger
  2. All of Shakespeare’s Works
  3. ‘The New York Trilogy’ – Paul Auster
  4. ‘Lolita’- Vladimir Nabokov
  5. ‘Lord of the Flies’ – William Golding 

Incidentally I have not read James Joyce’s – ‘Ulysses’, Miguel de Cervantes’ – ‘Don Quixote’ and a plethora of other very lengthy classics; I have however read Herman Melville’s unabridged – ‘Moby Dick’ and honestly it did nothing for me – so there you go, everyone has different tastes. The list continues: 

6.‘The Metamorphosis’ – Franz Kafka, 1915 – This is one of only two novellas which was published during his lifetime. This is a story of a man who wakes up only to find he has metamorphosed into a cockroach. This is quintessentially “Kafkaesque” and is obviously a metaphor of Kafka’s grim philosophy – nightmarish and surreal. This is not for everyone but I personally loved it; and if you enjoyed this, I strongly suggest you read is other works as well which are equally “Kafkaesque” if not more so.

7.‘Gulliver’s Travels’– Jonathon Swift, 1726 – I actually read this later in life so I didn’t take Gulliver’s Travels literally. Everyone should read this, it’s classic political satire plus I love the way the protagonist adroitly puts out a fire in the land of Lilliput.

8.‘Enduring Love’ – Ian McEwan, 1997 – The protagonist and is wife are having a picnic which gets interrupted when something catastrophic happens. I love the way McEwan writes and this is some story he weaves; they also made a movie with the same title which is also worth viewing.

9.‘Rabbit Run’ – John Updike, 1960 – John Updike was prolific to say the least and was also very much a ‘renaissance man’ – he was a novelist, art critic, literary critic, poet and so much more. I read the whole Rabbit series and loved them all equally – ‘Rabbit Run, Rabbit Redux, Rabbit is rich and finally Rabbit at Rest. John Updike, himself was sadly put to rest in 2009. I will never again hear about another new John Updike novel.

10.‘Affliction’ – Russell Banks, 1989 – I’m not sure if this would be categorized as literature but it’s certainly well-written and a great read. Wade Whitehouse is a violent, blue collar, alcoholic loser just like his father. Read the book and see the movie as well (same title) they’re both great.  

Well these are my arbitrary 10 and now it’s your turn – WHADAWETHINK? What are your favorite works of literature? Do you like my list? Open this up, this is a lot of fun; so much to talk about. I am always clamoring that people aren’t reading anything worthwhile anymore – prove me wrong!

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List of My Favorite Ten Great Works of Literature – Part 2

February 24th, 2011 by Michael Tabor

I have 100s of favorite great works of literature, however to go through each and every one of them would require that I write a book of at least 1000 pages (+ the fact that I have yet to seal a contract with Penquin Putnam or some other major book publisher – not yet anyway; perhaps some bigwig will read my blog and offer me a lucrative deal, but until then…) I am forced to list just 10. 

A very astute reader of this blog mentioned the fact that our taste changes over the years and furthermore it’s quite impossible to make a list of one’s favorite books because we as individuals change; what’s more important is the impact and impression the book had on you when you read it. When I read Salinger’s – ‘Catcher in the Rye’, I was blown away, however I read it when I was in high school and have no interest in reading it again; but what an impression it made on me !  So I think I should include it. 

I’ll put it to you this way, here are 8 more works of literature and I’ll be mindful of two things – what type of impression the book made on me at the time I read it and also I’ll try to pick great literature that can be read over and over and still elicit a strong response though it maybe prodigiously different from the first time I read it. 

3. ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ – J.D. Salinger, 1951 – This was probably the first serious piece of literature I’ve ever read, though it’s a very simple read; it’s written in a colloquial style. One views the world from the eyes of a disillusioned teenager, Holden Caulfield, as he jabs at all the phoniness of adulthood; especially affluent middle-class folks.

4. ‘All of Shakespeare’s Works’ – One should not go through life without reading all of Shakespeare’s works. Enough said.

5.  ‘New York Trilogy’ – Paul Auster, 1986 – How about some contemporary literature; Mr. Auster is still alive and I actually met him in person at Bryant Park in New York City. Believe it or not I happened to be reading one of his other books when I saw him and he was kind enough to autograph it for me. This is an absolute must-read for everyone. I actually found out about him by accident; I was in the literature section and I was going to purchase a Jane Austin novel for my wife and alphabetically after Austin comes Auster. So I picked up a copy, thumbed through it and found it to be quite interesting – & luckily it was ‘New York Trilogy’ – his first and by far his best work. ‘New York Trilogy’ is actually 3 separate novellas but they’re all connected. The only way to describe this book is that it’s a very post-modernist detective story which relies heavily on seemingly innocuous coincidence and chance and which ultimately has major implications and invariably ends up impacting all of the characters involved. I have read and re-read this book and I still find it to be endlessly fascinating.  

Well, this blog forum is definitely too short for something this important. I will have a part 3 tomorrow and perhaps I can get through the other 5 books. 

Now it’s your turn WHADAWETHINK? Who are your favorite authors? Do you prefer non-fiction over fiction? Studies have been done and it seems that many more women prefer fiction over non-fiction. Why is this?  There is no question about the fact that fiction is much more important than non-fiction and if it becomes a classic, it will remain with us forever. Please contribute.

If you like this site and you want to support WHADAWETHINK – click onto the widget shown here and shop at Amazon. Note: Any purchase at all will help WHADAWETHINK, so you don’t have to purchase the exact product displayed in the ad. Thanks and keep coming back.

 

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List of my favorite Ten Great Works of Literature

February 23rd, 2011 by Michael Tabor

I am a voracious reader and have read perhaps 500 + novels or pieces of literature in my lifetime and perhaps even more works of non-fiction. Unfortunately, I actually find myself reading more and more non-fiction for reasons I’m not quite sure.

In my opinion Literature is far more important than Non-fiction because unlike the latter there is an artistic quality that speaks to us beautifully regardless, even if the subject matter is ugly. Literature speaks to us in a voice that can never be duplicated in non-fiction; the themes are universal and literature is abundant in eternal truths and it enriches us with a feeling that never leaves us. Once you have read ‘Moby Dick’ or ‘Tom Sawyer’ one can never be the same. 

And finally, and most obviously unlike almost all non-fiction, Literature passes the test of time. I am reading a half dozen books on non fiction right now and I can assure you that most of the stuff I’m reading will be obsolete or not relevant in ten years or so, however ‘A Tale of Two Cities’ will remain a classic forever and never become outdated.  

To list just 10 of my favorites is more or less arbitrary because I have hundreds of favorites but nevertheless here they are and please note they are not in any particular order: 

  1. Lolita’- Vladimir Nabokov, 1955 –Really every one of Nabokov’s novels is a masterpiece. Nabakov’s native tongue was Russian but was fluent in French and obviously a master craftsman in English. As a matter of fact I believe he was the greatest English writing stylist of the 20th Century. What makes Lolita so fascinating is that it is a combination of art of the highest order mixed with taboo and utter revulsion – in pedophilia. Yet the Master manages to pull it off; every single page is teeming with allusions and metaphor. My suggestion is to read the ‘Annotated Lolita’.
  2. ‘Lord of the Flies’- William Golding, 1954 – I read this when I was a teenager and re-read it in my thirties. If you haven’t read it or don’t know the (they also made 2 films – one good; the older one and the newer version one unwatchable.) story it’s about a group of young schoolboys trapped on an island after surviving a plane crash. This is an incredibly profound book- Golding explores good and evil, survival of the fittest, chaos and order, law and anarchy, civilization and anarchy. After reading this you will invariably ask yourself – is man innately evil? Is man born with an incredible thirst for power? Does man implement structure in order to control masses of people? Great book !  

This is turning out to be a longer blog than I expected. Honestly I can write 10 blogs just on a single book. I will attempt to summarize the next eight books over the next coulple of blogs and I urge you to join in and give me your thoughts. 

WHADAWETHINK ? What are your favorite works of literature? Do you prefer literature or novels over non-fiction? I read a lot of novels when I was young and am very interested in current events, I’m assuming that’s why I read more non-fiction now – What do you think? What book has changed your life forever ?

If you like this site and you want to support WHADAWETHINK – click onto the widget shown here and shop at Amazon. Note: Any purchase at all will help WHADAWETHINK, so you don’t have to purchase the exact product displayed in the ad. Thanks and keep coming back.

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Joyce Carol Oates is Alive and Well

February 13th, 2011 by Michael Tabor

Joyce Carol Oates is alive and well and I am glad to hear it because much to my dismay, I heard a rumor that she passed away yesterday. A friend of mine called and said that Ms. Oates died; I quickly picked up the NY Times glanced at the obituaries and saw that Chuck Tanner died, mostly known for managing the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 1979 World Series title (remember Willie Stargell and their theme song by Sister Sledge –“We are Family”), Fred Kirby, (whom I didn’t know) an heir to the Woolworth fortune and former chief executive of a title insurance company died at the age of 91, and Tom Carnegie an announcer and known as the voice of the Indianapolis 500 (Is auto racing a sport? Another blog) died as well at the age of 91. But, no mention of the death of Joyce Carol Oates; a relief but maybe she died in the wee hours of the morning. 

I surfed the net and found nothing; I wound up on Yahoo and in the upper right hand corner of the page  saw her name posted under Yahoo’s Trending Now news stories and  nervously clicked onto Joyce Carol Oates’ name. Phew! Ms. Oates is not dead after all, she is 72 years old and has just come out with yet another book. (Oates is prodigiously prolific indeed; she has written at least 50 novels, 22 collections of short stories, 8 novellas, 8 plays, 15 non-fiction essays, 5 young adult novels,  and 3 works of fiction for children. This is just a list of her published works; she has tens of thousands of pages of mostly autobiographical material that she simply has not publically released.) This latest release is a memoir and is said to be quite different from anything else she has ever written. 

How do these rumors start? I called my friend back and asked him where he heard this and he said, “A bunch of people were discussing it at an AA meeting this morning,” (another blog) and that he just assumed it was true. I was going to write about how rumors start but I decided instead to spill some ink on the great Joyce Carol Oates. 

The memoir deals with the death of her husband, Raymond Smith, and her bout with severe depression afterwards. Her husband died unexpectedly in the hospital (he was admitted a week earlier diagnosed with pneumonia and at that time the prognosis of recovery was good; certainly not death) and on February 18th of 2008 he did in fact die from complications due to a strain of E-Coli in his lung. 

The book is more than 400 pages long and Ms. Oates writes with awe-inspiring detail about their 47 year marriage, how they grew in love, the week they spent together in the hospital right before he died, how she survive widowhood – especially the first year,  and how she eventually picked herself up and learned to live again. 

Joyce examines their life together and shares with us how much she loved him but also painstakingly writes about how much she did not know about her husband; the fact that Raymond Smith, her husband never revealed to her that he was once in love with another woman. Prior to my writing this blog, I read an article online in The New Yorker in the 12/13/2010 issue; this article vividly describes what the week in hospital was like for Joyce the last weak of her husband’s life.   

So WHADAWETHINK ? Do you like Joyce Carol Oates? Did you realize how prolific she was? What is your favorite Joyce Carol Oates book? Why would anyone spread a rumor about someone dying ? I have read many articles which she has contributed to the New Yorker but the only book I’ve ever read by her is surprisingly a non-fiction essay – ‘On Boxing.’  Believe it or not Joyce Carol Oates is a prodigious boxing fan (Norman Mailer was a great admirer of Joyce). This is easily the best book I’ve ever read on boxing; but it’s not just about the sport (if you can call it that) rather it’s an intensely personal intellectual journey and metaphor on survival. Thank God Joyce Carol Oates is Still with us.

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Life is Nasty, Brutish, and Short

February 11th, 2011 by Michael Tabor

The actual full Quotation is “Life is solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short.” By Thomas Hobbes – 1651 from perhaps the most profound philosophical book ever written – ‘Leviathan’. 

I have thousands of great books in my library, one of which is the aforementioned – ‘Leviathan’. I remember reading this in my 20’s and being astonished at how penetrating, profound and insightful and apropos the themes regarding the human condition were stated regardless of the fact that the book was written 325 years ago. There are eternal truths and there is an old adage that proclaims that Plato has written everything there is to know about life and the human condition and any other thing written or said is merely a footnote. So if you believe in this then even this masterpiece, ‘Leviathan’, is just another footnote to the great works of Plato. 

One can argue that ‘Leviathan’ is a treatise on political theory and Hobbes was writing about the state of affairs in England, circa 1588-1679 during the English Civil War. Hobbes believed in a powerful monarch and an absolute authority and therefore he supported King Charles I and was against the forces led by Oliver Cromwell.

 To put Hobbes’ convictions and conclusions into a neat nutshell it goes as follows: He believed that life was a constant struggle and there would always be war inasmuch as man was continually at odds with each other because we are all pursuing the same things – food, shelter, wealth, safety and security. (It’s the old argument that there are too many people and not enough natural resources; I personally think this is not in fact the case, I believe there is enough to go around for everyone and it’s really just an issue of greed. People think that they are special and therefore are entitled to more than their share. Go ahead call me a Socialist.) So not unlike Darwin’s ‘Survival of the Fittest’ (Darwin actually stated it was not so much the strongest who survived but one who was the best at adapting to one’s environment) and of course Karl Marx, Hobbes believed in the Common wealth.   

So if you accept the premise that man is a greedy, primal species, Hobbes viewed Commonwealth as a social contract analogous to a giant social organism. He concluded that if we didn’t have this contract and if we didn’t have an absolute authority and a powerful monarch we would have total chaos and individuals would not attain the shared goals of safety and security. The human species would be no different from any other animal. 

I’ve attempted to give a synopsis of this very complex concept of Thomas Hobbes and it’s impossible to not to sound somewhat facile but I strongly recommend everyone to read ‘Leviathan’ and just read the classics period. I love current events and I read the newspaper, magazines, surf the net, read other blogs (btw – if you’re not familiar with  Arts and Letters Daily you should check it out, it is probably one the best sites on the Web  http://www.aldaily.com/   but don’t forget to come back here) However I do read the classics as well and I go back to the original source. So read Plato and instead of reading a book about Charles Darwin, why not just read Darwin – read ‘The Origin of Species’. There is nothing wrong with criticism and I love Harold Bloom and Clifton Fadiman but there is nothing like reading the real thing; it’s like going back in time and getting into the mind of the greatest thinkers who ever lived. 

So WHADAWETHINK ? Have you read Leviathan ? Do you read the classics? Have you read Plato ? What are your favorite books of all time? Do you prefer modern literature? This blog could be 1000 pages long.

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Too Much Information

January 10th, 2011 by Michael Tabor

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jUwd737mioM

Click on the hyperlinlk (or cut & paste if it won’t let you) It’s a great song by the Police called ‘TOO Much Information’

Is it possible to have too much information? Just think about it. We have the internet, television with 1500 + channels, radio signals of every kind; terrestrial, satellite and internet, Millions of blogs; blogging about everything under the sun. We have newspapers, magazines that appeal to everyone from lovers of military history, cigar aficionados to may I not leave out – gossipmongers (Star magazine, The Enquirer, People, US; I think this is perhaps our biggest group).

I was going to spill some ink about something completely different (Michal Vick and dog fighting) but instead as I sat down, turned on my PC and glanced fleetingly around me, taking in my surroundings – bookcases, books everywhere, stacks of magazines (I’m an avid reader, always have been, ever since childhood) and as my computer booted up I realized that at my fingertips is the infinite library. Not only do I read the newspaper, books and magazines, I surf the net all day long perusing my favorite blogs and websites attempting to placate my rabid, insatiable appetite for information (btw I’ll plug my favorite site – Arts & Letters Daily  www.aldaily.com  ; 2nd only to my blog it’s the best place in Cyberspace)

So I plead guilty to having an unquenchable thirst for information. Knowledge is power, right? Negative, I read because I have to! I love to read as much as I love to write – but for its own sake. Art for art’s sake. I am an uncontrollable, impulsive, compulsive, and obsessive infomaniac. For birthdays, holidays or any other occasion where it’s appropriate to procure me a gift, I’m easy – just give me a gift receipt to Borders, Barnes & Nobles or any other Bookstore. (Isn’t it sad that the big boys B&N, Borders, etc. have gulped up and devoured practically our entire favorite and quaint book haunts – another blog)

So inasmuch as the aforementioned, I, Michael J. Tabor, am blogging about TOO MUCH INORMATION! Yes, indeed it’s too much of a good thing. Not unlike too much candy, cake, sex, alcohol, free time, etc.

I don’t know about you other infomaniacs, but I am always, daily as a matter of fact, racked with agonizing Lutheran guilt because I personally believe that I haven’t reached my quota of reading for the day. When the day is done (sometimes 2 in the morning) I still feel incomplete, a subtle pang of non fulfillment. I feel as though I’m missing something; I still don’t know everything, because as all info maniacs know we want to know EVERYTHING ! We don’t want to miss out on the party. God forbid we’re in a situation where we feel ignorant.

I think the perfect way to conclude this blog is to in a nut shell tell the story (if you don’t already know it) of ‘The Library of Babel’ by Jorge Luis Borges, the greatest Argentine writer, essayist, poet South America has ever produced. The story goes as follows (I’ll leave out the details. Read & reread it. It’s an absolute masterpiece written by a visionary genius): The universe is essentially a vast library in which every coherent book, magazine, etc is contained within its purview. Additionally every slightly erroneous book about every coherent book with every permutation (however slight) is included. So along with the understandable, articulate and logically connected books there is a lot of gibberish, a LOT of GIBBERISH; as a matter of fact the universe contains more gibberish than coherence. Note, the library contains every biography of every individual living and dead and even contains information about every single plant and animal. It contains all practical information as well and all words with every possible permutation so it can conceivably predict the future. Here’s another mind twisting detail, all this information is written in every language that exists now and that ever existed so thereby going back to say the Sumerian culture and its language. Now because there is such a GLUT of information, and so much gibberish and erroneous information, it’s impossible to get any real good solid information which sadly renders every individual in a state of suicidal despair. This is a MUST read book (short story – you can knock it off in 20 minutes) for anyone who has even the slightest degree of curiosity.

This is turning into a longer blog than I originally thought so I’ll definitely have a part 2.

So it’s your turn people. Comment. Galvanize discussion and stimulate interaction. And for the sake of humanity let us not allow Borges’s ‘Library of Babel” become a reality. Lastly have fun with this and let’s make   WHADAWETHINK   the hottest thing in Cyberspace.

If you like this site and you want to support WHADAWETHINK – click onto the widget shown above and shop at Amazon. Note: Any purchase at all will help WHADAWETHINK, so you don’t have to purchase the exact product displayed in the ad. Thanks and keep coming back.

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